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awake

survival tips and tricks

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So we are all learning and growing together. I thought we could start a thread were we could posts tips and tricks to survival that we have learned along the way. Anything and everything.

 

First up. Never trust your water source. what is fine today may not be fine tomorrow. Always filter or boil your water.

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Guest kevin

i'll have a go:

 

don't just stock just the sexy stuff(guns, ammo, and solar panels ) remember the basics. beans aren't sexy but 22 bullets taste like s#$%.

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This may or may not be common sense, and I struggle with it myself.

 

Never be too proud to accept your limitations or admit you just don't know. I've seen a lot of people get hurt or sick in the bush because they let their pride ride them.

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Expect mother nature to mess up your time-frame. Give yourself a couple extra hours to complete things. For example: Is it going to rain? Will the tide affect your travels? Will it snow? Will you be traveling against the wind? When is sun-down? I've mentioned these things before, but its worth repeating.

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Try to have appropriate footwear. The temptation is to go with hiking boots for hiking, but if you are trying to cover a big distance quickly and don't have to contend with snow, trail running shoes can be a MUCH better choice.

 

We get LOTS of water around here, so let me tell you: Cotton is not your friend. Sure, it's comfortable for day-to-day, when you can dry it out quickly, but if you're going to be sweating or out in the rain, look for modern fabrics that will wick moisture away from your body (and not just your clothes, but your underwear, too). Prevents chafing, rashes, and general misery. Make sure you have layers you can quickly shed and quickly don to deal with unexpected weather changes, and long before you need it, check all of your gear to see whether it's as water tight or water proof as advertised. Seams in particular are likely to leak, but they can be reinforced with sprays or patches ahead of time so that you're not an unexpectedly soggy mess.

 

Things that can help you start a fire if you're struggling:

 

* Hand sanitizer or alcohol prep pads from your first aid kit

* Potato chips and similar greasy snack foods

* Insect repellent

* Steel wool and a nine-volt battery (creates a spark)

 

You can also create your own fire starter kits REALLY easily using odds and ends of old candles, sawdust, and especially dryer lint. Melt the candle wax slowly, then make a mound of burnable materials about the size of 1-2 Tablespoons, pour the candle wax over it, and let it harden. It's really great if you pour them into paper egg cartons since you can break each segment of the carton apart and light them using the burnable material; muffin pan liners (for mini-muffins) also work VERY well. They burn fast and hot, and can help get your kindling going. We used to make big stockpiles of these in Girl Scouts, and they really did make camping easier!

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Awesome thread!!

I like to shut up and listen, some times I learn stuff.

this is true but its also important because then we can hear what's going on around us and not be loud there by giving away out position. You can never double checks items or safety gear too much

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Just a quick reality check.

Oregonchick mentioned bug spray to start a fire. spray the item to catch fire then apply spark. The aerosol spray can be made into a torch if you light the spray as it leaves the can. I wouldn't do this unless you want to practice your medical skills.

 

a couple of you touched on this idea. Anyone can practice their survival skills on a sunny day. Try you gear out in the worse conditions you can. Examples--- pitch a tent in the dark. start a fire in the wind and rain. use boiling and not filtering water for the weekend camping trip.

Edited by awake

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A large super soaker filled with gas makes a great flame thrower. Just use quick bursts so the flame doesnt travel up. This is very reckless, whick is why I did it to get the burn pile going when I was 15 lol.

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A large super soaker filled with gas makes a great flame thrower. Just use quick bursts so the flame doesnt travel up. This is very reckless, whick is why I did it to get the burn pile going when I was 15 lol.

 

Doc,

How long will that last until the gas eats the plastic in the super soaker? If it starts leaking while you are flame throwing then you are holding a large burning thing. Not a good life choice.

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Just a quick reality check.

Oregonchick mentioned bug spray to start a fire. spray the item to catch fire then apply spark. The aerosol spray can be made into a torch if you light the spray as it leaves the can. I wouldn't do this unless you want to practice your medical skills.

 

Whoops - forgot that little disclaimer; I was thinking of most of those things in the way that I would lighter fluid and kind of assumed others would, too, but assumptions can be risky. Thanks for catching it before someone accidentally turned themselves into a DEET-smelling human torch.

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Never add a piece of gear to your kit that you will depend on later, without at least trying it once to see if it works. Lots of things look great on paper, or work well for others, but not so well for you. The time to find out it doesn't work is NOW, before the price of failure is much higher.

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Always, always, ALWAYS think first and think safe! Whether just out in the bush or in a real SHTF situation....injuries and accidents can mean death. Everything from chopping wood to shooting all those cool toys you bought. Using a fire to climbing rocks and hiking in the wilderness. "How can I do this and make sure no one is going to get hurt?"

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Have a good spouse. The kind that says "I understand. What can I do to help."

 

Have good friends. The kind that when you are sitting in jail they are on the bench next to you saying "WOW! That was fun!"

 

Have Faith. Of the ten bad things you see coming down the road, that nine will fall off in the ditch before reaching you.

 

Have Hope. It will get you through anything.

 

Have toilet paper. You will need it.

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Whoops - forgot that little disclaimer; I was thinking of most of those things in the way that I would lighter fluid and kind of assumed others would, too, but assumptions can be risky. Thanks for catching it before someone accidentally turned themselves into a DEET-smelling human torch.

 

a few years ago i was lucky enought to be a boy scout leader that spent a week at boy scout summer camp with 18 boys. The folks running the camp told the boys about bug spray and lighters. They were told not to do what was just demonstrated. Yea right. I rounded up every can. The other troops had multiple encounters with bug spray torches.

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chap-stick is a must. get the medicated type. works for lips. works on chaffing. put it on your eye brows and sweat rolls away from your eyes. helps lube zippers. acts as a temporary seam sealer. lubes squeaky back pack parts.

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