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tinderwolf

New Garden for the season

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Has anyone grown corn? I want to plant some this season but curious if you have to do anything special for it...

 

I've never done anything special, but am growing vine green beans right next to it this year. Corn requires lots of nitrogen and the beans being legumes will keep putting nitrogen in the soil and the corn stalk acts as the trellis.

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I've never done anything special, but am growing vine green beans right next to it this year. Corn requires lots of nitrogen and the beans being legumes will keep putting nitrogen in the soil and the corn stalk acts as the trellis.

So thats what I've been doing wrong...I haven't had much luck growing corn, I will try this trick, Thanks Reg!

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Yes, the 3 sisters are a great way to grow 3 crops in a very limited space. I touched on it in the Survival Eating 2 article and there is a plethora of info on the net and several books on the subject. I've got Hopi Blue and sweet corn, 2 different pole beans (Blue Lake is 1:D) and acorn squash and pumpkins in my 3 Sisters plots.

 

Good call on the Purdue site Matt. Most of the universities have agriculture extensions which have info online whether it's for livestock or crops. Look for small community or "alternative" schools for alot of the vegetable info, as most big schools cater to the agri business crops only (IMO).

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I am. I have 3 varieties and I'm not sure on the footage. I have 1 type that produces big juicy carrots for juicing. I like carrots in my salad, so of course I have them...lol. My garden is half "salad bar" with about 5 different lettuce types, plus other greens like cabbage, spinach and kale, radishes, tomatoes, cucumbers, etc.

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Glad you folks have got started hope everything grows well.

 

young fig I am waiting on it brothers and sisters

 

 

 

young peach I never get these the damn squirrels get them I might get a

few

 

here is the green house 10' x 20'

 

 

 

new addition pergola 14' x 20' may incorporate it into one large green house.

 

 

just in case it gets cold a barrel full of old mail and a wood heater.

 

 

Edited by juzcallmesnake

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So thats what I've been doing wrong...I haven't had much luck growing corn, I will try this trick, Thanks Reg!

 

Corn is a member of the "grass" family and nitrogen is essential. In the early part of the season, high nitrogen fertilizers (chicken manure as I don't use chemicals) are great. The ph test is also needed and corn prefers an alkali ph (why they use agriculture lime).

Here is a link for growing corn, hope it helps.

http://www.onthegreenfarms.com/fruit-vegetable/how-to-grow-organic-corn/

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What ever you do use poly carbonate roofing panels

the plastic is 1/3 cheaper but will not hold up and a good hail will destroy plastic

basically it is treated 4x4 posts and landscaping timbers and lag bolts

in order to increase lifespan drive nails into 4x4 area that will be concreted in and paint liberally

with tar and cement in make sure the concrete is slightly mounded so it sheds water.

this prevents rot.

 

Directly place 4x4 on top of uprights and using a 1/4 in paddle /spade bit predrill hole into upright and

 

 

lag bolt in place making sure every thing is plumb and level also make sure it fits the length of your

 

roof sheeting.

 

I ran out of money but I am adding gutters and downspouts to catch rain water in a cistern

 

in colder climates you can double the walls and ceiling inside and out for extra insulation

 

a small propane heater can keep it warm enough to keep your plants happy or a wood heater

 

as most times it is only needed 6 to 8 hours.

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Guest kevin
Yes, the 3 sisters are a great way to grow 3 crops in a very limited space. I touched on it in the Survival Eating 2 article and there is a plethora of info on the net and several books on the subject. I've got Hopi Blue and sweet corn, 2 different pole beans (Blue Lake is 1:D) and acorn squash and pumpkins in my 3 Sisters plots.

 

Good call on the Purdue site Matt. Most of the universities have agriculture extensions which have info online whether it's for livestock or crops. Look for small community or "alternative" schools for alot of the vegetable info, as most big schools cater to the agri business crops only (IMO).

 

planting the three sisters at the end of may....just as soon as i harvest the early garden(potatoes,onion,sweet peas)....gotta wait til then so ill have room....the bucket garden will have to do til then....57 buckets so far.

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Another site and magazine for those interested:

http://www.motherearthnews.com/

 

They are a little left leaning, ok, so alot..lol, but they offer some great advice on homesteading and gardening. They are running a special right now if you subscribe to their magazine online for $10 for a year and that also includes the digital versions of "extra" issues and such.

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planting the three sisters at the end of may....just as soon as i harvest the early garden(potatoes,onion,sweet peas)....gotta wait til then so ill have room....the bucket garden will have to do til then....57 buckets so far.

 

I'm doing some planter boxes at my house (live in town...yuck...) and have the big garden at my mother-in-laws this year. I'm looking to get out of this house and move back to my rural lifestyle I truly miss.

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What ever you do use poly carbonate roofing panels

the plastic is 1/3 cheaper but will not hold up and a good hail will destroy plastic

basically it is treated 4x4 posts and landscaping timbers and lag bolts

in order to increase lifespan drive nails into 4x4 area that will be concreted in and paint liberally

with tar and cement in make sure the concrete is slightly mounded so it sheds water.

this prevents rot.

 

Directly place 4x4 on top of uprights and using a 1/4 in paddle /spade bit predrill hole into upright and

 

 

lag bolt in place making sure every thing is plumb and level also make sure it fits the length of your

 

roof sheeting.

 

I ran out of money but I am adding gutters and downspouts to catch rain water in a cistern

 

in colder climates you can double the walls and ceiling inside and out for extra insulation

 

a small propane heater can keep it warm enough to keep your plants happy or a wood heater

 

as most times it is only needed 6 to 8 hours.

 

Thanks JCMS. I was looking at some building surplus stores that sell storm windows extremely cheap. I was figuring a small woodstove for my winter weather here in the Great Lakes region and using rain water catch basins also for water. I just have to figure out the size and would like to make it sectional so I can move it when I get lucky and can move someplace I don't have to listen to the neighbor snore...lol. I prefer needing to use the Hubble to see my closest neighbor and even then, the neighbor is a "long distance call".

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Nice JCMS. I'm figuring out how to add a greenhouse to my set up as well.

 

being able to grow 365 is a great jump on ground growing plans can be planted months before and allowed

to have a head start on the season.

if your greenhouse is double walled and a grow light even in the harshest winters you can have some

out of season treats if you live in northern regions the roof pitch need to be steeper than mine so

weight of snow and ice do not crush the roof or inhibit the transmission of light.

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After futher research on corn this was recommened by my Farmbureau..

 

 

Hickory King Yellow Dent Corn

 

 

Since the 1800s, this Appalachian heirloom has been one of the best all around corn grown in the USA. It has been said to grow “as high as an elephant's eye” with 10-12 ' heights being commonplace. Each stalk produces 2 ears of large, yellow, “shiny as satin” kernels that are full of that “Down South” rich, traditional flavor. Hominy, cornmeal, grits and roasting ears from this variety are in a class by themselves! It is also somewhat resistant to southern leaf blight and its tightly wrapped husks help deter corn ear worms and beetles!

 

$1.87 for 1/2 lb and I got 2 packs..;)

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Planting by the Moon.

 

 

 

 

 

Gardening by the Moon Calendar from the Farmers' Almanac

 

The Farmers Almanac Gardening by the Moon Calendar is determined by our age-old formula and applies generally to regions where the climate is favorable.

 

 

April 2012

8th-9th Good Days For Planting Beets, Carrots, Radishes, Turnips, Peanuts, And Root Crops. Also Good For Cabbage, Cauliflower, Lettuce, Kale, Celery, And Other Leafy Vegetables. Start Seedbeds. Good Days For Transplanting.

10th-12th Barren Period. Do No Planting.

13th-14th Favorable Days For Planting Beets, Carrots, Turnips, Radishes, Onions, And Root Crops.

15th-17th Excellent Time To Kill Weeds, Briars, Poison Ivy, And Plant Pests.

18th-19th Favorable Days For Planting Root Crops, Extra Good For Vine Crops. Set Strawberry Plants. Good Days For Transplanting.

20th-21st Poor Planting Day. Break Ground Or Cultivate.

22nd-23rd Favorable Days For Planting Beans, Corn, Cotton, Tomatoes, Peppers, And Aboveground Crops.

24th-25th Poor Days For Planting, Seeds Will Rot In The Ground.

26th-27th Plant Tomatoes, Beans, Peppers, Corn, Cotton, And Other Aboveground Crops. Plant Seedbeds. Start Flower Gardens.

28th-30th Grub Out Weeds, Briars, And Other Plant Pests.

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After futher research on corn this was recommened by my Farmbureau..

 

 

Hickory King Yellow Dent Corn

 

 

Since the 1800s, this Appalachian heirloom has been one of the best all around corn grown in the USA. It has been said to grow “as high as an elephant's eye” with 10-12 ' heights being commonplace. Each stalk produces 2 ears of large, yellow, “shiny as satin” kernels that are full of that “Down South” rich, traditional flavor. Hominy, cornmeal, grits and roasting ears from this variety are in a class by themselves! It is also somewhat resistant to southern leaf blight and its tightly wrapped husks help deter corn ear worms and beetles!

 

$1.87 for 1/2 lb and I got 2 packs..;)

 

Matt, that is 1 variety I got this year. I'm planting 4 different varieties of corn, 2 are "sweet" corn and 2 are "Indian" corn for meal.

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