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MarineSgt

Watches that do it all

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Being a Meteorologist in the Marine Corps I learned a lot about how weather affects operations. Weather is a thing that most people don't really consider when it comes to survival. Of course we wear warm clothes when its cold and less when its hot. We also bring rain gear in case it rains. In many survival situations people are surprised when it starts to rain when they are working at camp. I never really see anyone ever talk much about watches that read barometric pressure. You don't have to be a meteorologist to read a bar graph. There are a million watches out there on the market that will read the pressure and put it in a graph for you to see. Makes simple forecast just that, SIMPLE. Two of the most popular brands out there are Casio (my favorite) as well as Suunto. The Casio PAG 240 that I own will read the pressure, temperature, altimeter, and also has a built in compass. The watch also includes Sun rise and sun set data, who doesn't want to know how much longer they have until they need to be back at camp. Personally I believe this to be one of the best multi tools for any survival situation or even simple overnight camping. Heres a link to a review I did on the watch. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TYcoaOUL_Fo

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Nice watch. Did I understand correctly that it is solar powered? If so it would be a great asset. But I would still wear my military issued wind up, if for no other reason than a backup. In case of an EMP the wind up will still work.

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I'm pretty sure you cant change the heading to display mils, but I will take a look. Just out of curiosity why would you want to display mils? You have a mortar or something? I also had a G-shock, it worked great for five years. I really put it to the test, diving, running, hiking, even took it to Afghanistan. The only thing it couldn't handle was a German Shepherd chewing on the band! lol Yes it is solar powered, the battery last forever in it as well. Ive never had to actually put it in a window or try to charge the battery. Normal use will charge it right up. I looked at the Suunto Core but I didn't like how the face read. It seemed to be more of a "looks" watch that the Casio. They both pretty much do the same thing but again I have had a Casio and trust their products.

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I started navigating with mils about ten years ago for a special school and it just kind of grew on me. Been doing it every since and I'm just more comfortable with it now. My current MOS is forward observer though so I end up playing with mils a lot too.

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Not many people are familiar with mils. I also took some training a few years ago for forward observations. Not too many people out of the military call for fire. lol I'm going to find the manual today and look to see if you can change the heading.

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Being a graduate of 'Comanche County Cannon Cockers College' (FT. Sill, Okla for those who don't know) I appreciate the uses of the mil but like the Sarge says, not many do understand it. It is kind of nice to hear it mentioned every now and again.

 

I used it a lot in the Pershing world when doing survey. We could have used fractional degrees I guess but the mil was just so bloody convenient ALL the time. I did like my T-2 theodolite. Could even do stellar navigation with it. Wish I had my old one, sight.:)

 

For those who may not know, 1 mil is the angle that 1 meter makes at 1000 meters distance (or 1 yard at 1000 yards - it scales) and there are 6400 of them in a circle. It is how gunners lay and adjust a non-direct fire weapon like a mortar or artillery piece.

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Yeah Capt,

the kind of precision you can get from mils without having to crunch numbers is one of the reasons I've gone to using them. That and the way it can plug into distance shooting if your familiar with the system. To be honest I haven't seen land-nav done in the army with degrees since right after I first joined, and that was an old first sergeant (Vietnam Veteran) that was set in his ways. It interfaces so seamlessly with an MGRS map that there isn't much of a reason to use degrees anymore, unless your dealing with air support... silly pilots :rolleyes:

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Using Barometric pressure and wind direction to make simple forecast.

Winds SW-NW and pressure 30.10-30.20= Fair with slight temperature change for one to two days.

Winds SW to NW and pressure 30.10-30.20 and rising rapidly= Fair followed by rain within two days.

Winds SW to NW and pressure 30.20 and above and stationary= Continued fair, with no decided temperature changes.

Winds SW to NW and pressure 30.20 and above and falling slowly= Slowly rising temperatures and fair for two days.

Winds S to SE and pressure 30.10 to 30.20 and falling slowly= Rain within twenty-four hours.

Winds S to SE and pressure 30.10 to 30.20 and falling rapidly= Wind increasing in force, with rain within twelve to twenty-four hours

Winds SE to NE and pressure 30.10 to 30.20 and falling slowly= Rain in twelve to eighteen hours.

Winds SE to NE and pressure 30.10 to 30.20 and falling rapidly= Increasing wind and rain within twelve hours.

Winds E to NE and pressure 30.10 and above and falling slowly= During summer and times of light winds, rain may not fall for several days; in winter, rain within twenty-four hours.

Winds E to NE and pressure 30.10 and above and falling rapidly= During summer, rain is probable within twelve to twenty-four hours; in winter, rain or snow with increasing winds.

Winds SE to NE and pressure 30.00 or below and falling slowly= Rain will continued for one to two days.

Winds SE to NE and pressure 30.00 or below and falling rapidly=Rain with high wind, followed (usually within thirty-six hours) by clearing (and colder conditions in the winter)

Winds S to SW and pressure 30.00 and rising slowly= Clearing within a few hours, followed by several days of fair weather.

Winds S to E and pressure 29.80 or below and falling rapidly= Severe storm imminent, followed within twenty-four hours by clearing (and colder conditions in the winter)

Winds E to N and pressure 29.80 or below and falling rapidly- Severe northeast gale and heavy precipitation; in the winter, often heavy snow followed by a cold wave.

West wind and pressure 29.80 or below and rising rapidly- clearing and colder.

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