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Schoeny

Wild garden

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Another good field guide is by Bradford Agiers (sp). The photos/drawings are all in color and has a very good description of the plant, parts used, and some preparation info. There is a Edible and a medicinal guide.

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Another option for a wild garden is planting flowers and building a beehive/home to draw and keep bees nearby (allergies can be deadly so use caution). The bees will help pollinate the crops and if they have a hive nearby and establish a colony, this will supply honey which has several uses in the food and medical fields. The bees may also be a deterrent to people passing by.... most avoid bees and their stings. This isn't a guarantee but any degree of help can make a difference.

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Guest kevin

bees interest me as a deterant too.....see shady people coming, not sure if deadly force is needed, wait till the get by the bee boxes....shoot the boxes.

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I remember two thing from my childhood on the farm that you can set free and have a lifetime supply of horseradish and some heirloom winter onion that my grandparents had that "crowned" huge clusters that would fall to the ground the patch grew from a small patch when I first remember to a island bigger than a bus after high school when my dad plowed tilled and burned it out of existence. I wish I had a few good starts of it now were strong and spicy but good if you caught them very early. Some of the older cherry tomatoes are also very hardy and will with just a little help keep coming back year after year.

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Don, yes horseradish is a great plant, along with rhubarb and asparagus for ones that just keep coming back. I didn't know about those particular onions tho, thanks.

What other kinds of edible plants could be planted and come back year after year? I have planted rhubarb and asparagus, grapes, and this year strawberries, but I would like more ideas.

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I know the raspberry patch in our back yard kept coming back year after year. What about planting something a little more long term, like an apple tree? Thats assuming your planning either on bugging in, or have a BoL where that would be possible.

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I know the raspberry patch in our back yard kept coming back year after year. What about planting something a little more long term, like an apple tree? Thats assuming your planning either on bugging in, or have a BoL where that would be possible.

You are correct sir...I do have a couple apple trees planted, but my wife keeps running the raspberries over with the lawnmower lol...

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What other kinds of edible plants could be planted and come back year after year? I have planted rhubarb and asparagus, grapes, and this year strawberries, but I would like more ideas.

Jerry, depending on your locale (OPSEC is more important than me knowing more than posted) but any of the berries will pretty much continue to grow. If the soil is acidic, or you have hardwood leaves to use as mulch, blueberries are another great continuing crop. Potatoes can be left to grow year after year, altho I do not believe the crops will be as good in follow up years. I believe, not 100% sure tho, that many of the root vegetables will grow but yields and size of the vegetables will be smaller. I'm trying to find if anyone has tried it and what type of reports/studies are out on it.

Cherry trees, especially the tart cherries (pie cherries to some but I eat them raw) are also great and are a natural pain reliever without the side effects of aspirin (available in pill form also). Onions/leeks/garlic will grow wild and these can be used to help mask other crops to keep them safer from animals.

Now the following list will just name SOME of the plants you can "plant and forget", as they are found in the wild: dandelions, burdock, cattails, false solomon's seal, solomon's seal, sassafrass, clover, alfalfa, chicory, chickweed, milkweed, lambs quarter, mustard, shepherd's purse, green amaranth, and plantains.

I'm working an article now that will be covering these plants (and a few more), along with medicinal plants. Many of these plants are also medicinal in properties and can be gotten from nurseries because they are used as ornamentals in landscaping.

Horseradish, dandelions and cattails are also natural "filters". They thrive in areas with "contamination" and nature's way of balancing the soil back out. (Sorry my terminology isn't the most intellectual on this matter). Hope these give you a decent start.

Edited by Regulator5

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Guest kevin

yesterday my wife and i were walking to look at our planted garden( about 20yards)....she challenged me to identify as many wild plants that are edible as i could before we got there....i found 13.....gotta love spring.

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LOL.. what was her reply Kevin?

 

Mine hates it when I point out that the lawn is edible. Grasses are edible, even if they aren't exactly well suited for the palate. They get upset when I want to name every new dog "Kagogi" (spelling). I refer to her minpin as "skillet size".

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Guest kevin

...and we haven't even started on the kittens yet.....i like mine fried with onions.

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Now if you want to really get you lady going take her through a oriental open air food market....likely to see everything from alligator to zebra and all thebugs, kittens, pups, snakes and rats etc. your little tummy could desire.

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As a Certified Master Herbalist and owner of a Heirloom Seed company I would plant both herbs that could be used for medicinal purposes and vegetables too. Examples of what "I" do plant in several of my herb beds are: onions, garlic, spinach, watercress, clover, parsley, turnips, radish, carrot etc. Many of these seeds can be scattered and don't need much soil covering to start the germination process. Also depending on your terrain Mother Nature will take care of the watering as well. If you take the time to plant them it might be a good idea to check them and harvest SOME of them. You can check them when your and your family are training for EVAC to the BOL.

 

Also Harvesting them encourages the plant to keep producing and leaving some to seed will allow it to do just that SEED. Again Mother Nature will take care of this and scatter the seeds in other places. I have watercress and clover going in places in my garden where it was never planted and it could have only come from the winds scattering the seeds all over the place.

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