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Schoeny

Wild garden

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I read somewhere (I think it may have even been on this forum) about a 'wild garden'. The impression I got was if you have a BoL thats is perhaps a state park, or somewhere way out in the boonies, you could plant a scattering of some hardy veggies, and hopefully there would be some there already growing if you ever had to bug out. You could also plant some stuff along your bug out route in case you had to travel by foot (if that would take you more than a day or so).

 

I guess my question to any gardeners would be, what are some hardy types of veggies that you can sort of plant and forget? I realize this would not -guarantee- you have some supplemental food, but for the small investment of time and seed cost, it might be something to consider.

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Asparagus should be a good choice. Watch the maturity rate, as some take 2 years and others take up to 5 years (from seed). Onions, garlic, potatoes, rhubarb, alfalfa, lettuce, spinach, etc can all be grown in woodlands. You will have to check your soil Ph and look for crops that grow well in shade or find clearings and plant on the northern side for maximum sunlight. You can also look into finding "wild plants" that are food sources and plant them in the area. False Solomon's Seal and cattails are 2 prime examples. I'd also recommend looking into what the Native Americans foraged in your area. There are several books on the Ojibawa/Chippewa available and will cover your locale.

You can also get many different types of wild berries to plant, fruit and nut trees.

Here is a link that offers some great suggestions. Remember, you will need heirloom, open pollinated seeds or you will have to plant every year.

http://www.bukisa.com/articles/356427_forest-gardening-shade-tolerant-vegetables-herbs

 

I hope this helps. I'd personally choose plants that do not require severe "help" in growing but would also make the trips to cull weeds and aerate the soil at times also. Plus just hiking out and "tending" the garden will allow you to keep scouting the way and getting more familiar with your chosen site(s).

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Regulator5, that is -exactly- what I am thinking. Hardy plants that dont require constant attention to grow in a wild to semi-wild habitat. Something that you can check on maybe once or twice (at most) a year, and it should only be to keep where you planted things fresh in your mind. The intended purpose, to hopefully have some crops already harvestable if you ever had to bug out (assuming its the right time of year of course, and not the dead of winter).

 

And another good suggestion to look into wild edibles in my area. I plan on doing that, but havent gotten around to it yet. Hopefully this spring and summer a friend and I are going to do a mock bug out, to test our plan and equiptment. I figured that would be an ideal time to plant some things and see how it goes.

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Schoeny, the practice Bug Out will be effective, but also remember you will need to go during "planting" season. Also by adding the food plots, you will invariably draw wild game into the area for other food options; but this can also lead to other people coming in while following game. You will have to plan for this event also. I'd suggest establishing food plots away from my actual BOL and having seeds on hand to plant a garden when needed.

With being in MN, wild rice is a definite option for you. The known plots will be magnets for people looking for food but if you can find an area not frequented and plant it to establish an unknown source, I know it thrives in MN.

http://www.ehow.com/how_4531403_grow-wild-rice.html

There are sites that you can get seed from, just do a web search if you think it is practical for you.

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Guest kevin

i started learning to identify wild plants for eating years ago. today i can identify well over 100 different plants for that purpose. it is a great hobby and useful even now. two or three times a year we have a survival meal with only what we find or catch on the menu, its a blast. my 7 year old loves it, he is up to about 20 he can identify ,and climbing.......turd will pass me up by the time he's 15 at the present rate....ya i'm a proud poppa.

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i started learning to identify wild plants for eating years ago. today i can identify well over 100 different plants for that purpose. it is a great hobby and useful even now. two or three times a year we have a survival meal with only what we find or catch on the menu, its a blast. my 7 year old loves it, he is up to about 20 he can identify ,and climbing.......turd will pass me up by the time he's 15 at the present rate....ya i'm a proud poppa.

 

Good deal Kevin. My 13 year old step son is now showing an interest, so I get to start teaching him this summer. My nephew is pretty decent and we had a blast when he was younger when he found out grasshoppers were edible...lol. My Mom and sister didn't share in my Dad's and I sense of accomplishment though. I alwasy grab plants while I'm out hunting. I like that mushroom and squirrel "seasons" coincide here in the Midwest.

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Excelent and on my to do list when my packs come in..

 

my small test this winter involved carrots..when my garden was done in November I cleared a 2ft x 3 ft area and tossed small amount of carrot seed.covered and left alone..

Today I pulled up small carrots about 3 inch long 1/2 inch wide..

Go figure..so Im taking oinions and bulbs to the woods soon...

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Guest kevin

our favorite is brier tops. taste a lot like asparagus and more than plentiful in our area. i'm scared of most mushrooms. the only ones i can identify readily are shaggy mane, chicken of the woods, puff balls, and morel.

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They have some really nice "pamphlet" size field guides that are laminated. I got them at Barnes and Noble. They have mushrooms, trees, tracks, birds, weather, etc. They are normally in the nature section and offer color photos.

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Excelent and on my to do list when my packs come in..

 

my small test this winter involved carrots..when my garden was done in November I cleared a 2ft x 3 ft area and tossed small amount of carrot seed.covered and left alone..

Today I pulled up small carrots about 3 inch long 1/2 inch wide..

Go figure..so Im taking oinions and bulbs to the woods soon...

I wouldn't look at this as a failure. You just know they will be "baby carrot" size so may need more but at least they will offer some fresh veggies in the winter if needed.

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I was actually thinking of scattering plants around my secondary BoL, rather than making a traditional type of garden. Kind of spreading the plants over several acres of area around a small lake. Mostly I would be doing this as a test since right now my secondary BoL is way to close to my primary, but it is a good spot to test out what will work, and what wont (hopefully lol).

 

Im also planning on taking my son and daughter out 'camping' this year when they come to visit. While we are out I want to start teaching them some basic survival skills, like making fire and shelter. Since they live with thier mother about 1000 miles away, its about all I can do right now to start getting them prepared.

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Schoeny, I agree and whatever you can teach them, they will be better off for it; plus the bonding time is awesome.

 

Depending on the plants, I'd plant in a semi normal plot just for control issues. Also look at "companion" gardening, as these will give you great ways to plant the most in small spaces. I'd plant several really small plots with as much variety as possible. You can also look into the "3 Sisters" gardening, altho the corn will not be as easy to conceal in the wild. There are several ways and means and the final decision is yours to make based on locale, soil, and personal preference.

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Heh! If it were up to personal preference I would plant nothing but spicy peppers. I was (am) about as picky as a 2 year old that hates vegetables, but I am slowly getting better. And I have always found hunger makes even wet cardboard look appetizing, so I am going to plant what grows well in that area, whatever it may be, and I figure I can grow to love it as it keeps me from starving ;)

 

Sounds like I will have to do a little research on what grows well in that area, but you have all given me some excellent ideas for a good start I think. Now Ill just have to try some different combinations out and see what works, and if it will reseed itself for next year and the years to come. Oh, and as for the small plots, would something like a 2x2 area work? Ill probably only have a military e-tool for breaking ground, so I want to go as small as possible, and make maybe 3-4 plots.

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A 2x2 plot will work, but it may limit the number of plants over spacing and other issues. A tool I would recommend for turning the dirt would be a trapper's trowel (link at bottom to show what they are). These will allow you to work a little deeper (carrots need about 12 inches of soft dirt to grow really good for example). There are a few different styles of trappers trowels/shovels. I actually have the regular one as shown in link but also a narrow one with a longer blade. This narrow one was homemade out of a piece of 4 inch steel pipe cut in half and then pointed at the end. The handle is steel pipe, welded on and a "T" attached to the end (just for an idea); I've seen some similiar ones at hardware stores.

Another way to set it up, altho it would be more labor instensive, would be to dig up some soil and make mounds with peat moss or potting soil to plant in. This would be dependent on being able to get a wagon back to the site to haul the material. Like everything, you will be only limited by imagination; the crops will be limited by weather and soil conditions.

You can also make your seed starts in the cardboard egg cartons (I believe it's been discussed on another thread) and pack these in and plant the seedlings from this system. I'm not sure how well all vegetables do on reseeding themselves, so a harvest and planting trip(s) may be necessary to really complete the plot every year. I know asparagus and rhubarb will just keep growing, as well as many root veggies.

 

http://sustainableseedco.com/bean-heirloom-seeds/ This link is a site that sales seeds but also lists some basic planting information.

 

http://www.amazon.com/Standard-Trappers-Trowel-22-Long/dp/B0031TU4LC

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Coyotes can be a major competitor (as well as a threat) for food; especially if DNR starts releasing them. In IN, the DNR started releasing coyotes to "control" the deer population. I would think that selling more deer "tags" and allowing hunters to harvest more would have controlled the population and added funds to the conservation coffers. They ended up getting trouble for breaking their own regulation about releasing non native species but the damage was done.

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Heh! If it were up to personal preference I would plant nothing but spicy peppers. I was (am) about as picky as a 2 year old that hates vegetables, but I am slowly getting better. And I have always found hunger makes even wet cardboard look appetizing, so I am going to plant what grows well in that area, whatever it may be, and I figure I can grow to love it as it keeps me from starving ;)

 

Sounds like I will have to do a little research on what grows well in that area, but you have all given me some excellent ideas for a good start I think. Now Ill just have to try some different combinations out and see what works, and if it will reseed itself for next year and the years to come. Oh, and as for the small plots, would something like a 2x2 area work? Ill probably only have a military e-tool for breaking ground, so I want to go as small as possible, and make maybe 3-4 plots.

 

Also, do not forget herbs. They will add flavor to food and many have medicianal properties as well. DrBonesandNurseAmy have alot of information on their site for these. Herbs were wild before any cultivation in modern times; many still thrive in natural habitat.

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Well I know that chives thrive in my back yard with absolutely NO help lol. My wife planted some in a small container along a fence in our back yard about 5 years ago, and they are still going strong, with no fertilizer, watering or anything resembling care lol. My wife has a survival of the fittest plant philosophy: If it cant survive on its own, it deserves to die!

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