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MikeE

Substitute for cholesterol Meds?

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Anyone know of a substitute for cholesterol Meds? Mine makes my legs ache and I'm about ready to pitch them. My number untreated is about 220 so it's not thru the roof. I watch what I eat but without the med I can't get below 200, despite walking about 10 miles a week. I assume that Dr.Bones and Nurse Amy may have a suggestion; a herb or something. Any script med would run out when SHTF anyway, so I need a backup plan

Edited by MikeE

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Mike, I took Zetia and Lipitor and Niaspan for years and could barely keep the HDL/LDL cholesterol numbers at acceptable levels. But when I started taking 1000mg of fish oil twice a day the bad numbers came tumbling down. Check with your Dr first and see if fish oil may something he recommends. It worked for me.

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barley juice powder, royal jelly, fenu greek, dandelion, shitake and reishi mushrooms, plantain are but some used in the battle with cholesterol

 

Mike, The above list was copied from the Survival eating 2 article on SC. I pulled this partial list from the Herb Encyclopedia I mentioned.

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I got that bad c from genes you know ...... So tried generic type meds but the cramp me up , not a good sign so my doc gave me a name brand ,crestor, no more cramps , and there is a difference between name brand and generic. Also my doc said omega 3 fish oil gel caps , up to two 1000 mg a day if I can handle the fish taste when I burp , and it does help bring down the count

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Hi Homegrown. Yesterday the F.D.A. added new warnings about Crestor about it causing diabetes in some people. http://www.drugalert.org/news/2011/06/23/crestor-diabetes-risk-goes-high-dosage

 

As far as other solutions than drugs, one of my family members reversed her diabetes, high blood pressure, high triglycerides, high cholesterol by following Dr. Dean Ornish's spectrum diet, but that can be a complete lifestyle change.

 

Best of luck to you.

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Thanks everyone. I have been doing the fish oil thing since the first of the year, so I may just go off the med awhile before the next blood test to see what happens. The fish oil burp leaves a bad taste in my mouth but that's a small price to pay if it helps

 

Thanks again!

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I've heard from a PA that freezing the fish oil capsules and taking them while frozen is supposed to help with the fish oil burps. I haven't tried it myself, but it might work. My husband had super high triglycerides a few years back, and his specialist had him taking 4000mg twice a day. He took his with lots of chocolate milk. I believe increasing your fiber intake is supposed to help some too.

 

I hope the fish oil helps and you can get off the meds.

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apple cider vinegar tablets

 

a friend swears by them I got some on order if you would have seen him before it would make

you run out and by the too.

 

it has numerous other benefits also

 

fish oil / krill oil capsules

 

cook and use olive oil only no other, the light oil for eggs light flavored food like cornbread

 

olive oil draws out the bad cholesterol to a great degree it is not a "wonder drug" but it is very

 

good as it gets for natural oils others can have negative consequences/ gut cramps elevated

 

salt levels or to fatty for your liver.

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I'll look into the apple cider vinegar tabs. Thanks, Snake. I'm going to pick up some niacin and give that a try too. I've been reading about it...it sounds like hot flashes are a possible side effect, so now my better half and I can have hat flashes together. LOL

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Anyone know of a substitute for cholesterol Meds? Mine makes my legs ache and I'm about ready to pitch them. My number untreated is about 220 so it's not thru the roof. I watch what I eat but without the med I can't get below 200, despite walking about 10 miles a week. I assume that Dr.Bones and Nurse Amy may have a suggestion; a herb or something. Any script med would run out when SHTF anyway, so I need a backup plan

 

Hi Mike, I am in the same boat as you, my doctor had me try several different cholesterol meds until we found one that didn't cause my body to ache. I am on genaric Lipitor now. I hope you will post your results on the different substutes suggested here. Try krill oil as it doesn't give you the fish burps. Good luck.

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Thanks BnG. Will do.

 

Dr. Bones, I don't remember the numbers breakdown. I don't recall the numbers being way out of whack but I'm just not sure. I'll report back when I find out. In the meantime, I'm going to start some niacin and hope that I don't get the hot flashes. I'm going to give it a month and then get the blood tested again, and go from there. I'm tired of the leg aches and weakness. I've always had very strong legs, and for you ladies out there, I've been told that my legs still look great. LOL

Edited by MikeE

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From web MD:

 

Some of the herbal and nutritional supplements said to lower cholesterol include:

 

Garlic: According to some studies, garlic may decrease blood levels of total cholesterol by a few percentage points. Other studies, however, suggest that it may not be as beneficial as once thought. It may also have significant side effects and/or interactions with certain medications. Garlic may prolong bleeding and blood clotting time, so garlic and garlic supplements should not be consumed prior to surgery and should not be taken with blood-thinning drugs such as Coumadin (warfarin).

 

Guggulipid: Guggulipid is the gum resin of the mukul myrrh tree. In clinical studies performed in India, guggulipid significantly reduced blood levels of total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol. The enthusiasm for using guggulipid as a cholesterol-lowering herbal agent, however, diminished after the publication of negative results from a clinical trial in the U.S. Further research is necessary to determine the safety and efficacy of this herb.

 

Red Yeast Rice: Red yeast rice has been found to lower cholesterol in studies and was previously found in the over-the-counter supplement Cholestin. However, in 2001, FDA took Cholestin off the shelf because it contained lovastatin, a compound found in the cholesterol prescription medication Mevacor. Reformulated "Cholestin" no longer contains red yeast rice. Other red yeast rice-containing supplements currently available in U.S. contain very small amounts of lovastatin. Their effectiveness is questionable.

 

Policosanol: Produced from sugar cane, policosanol was found to be effective in lowering LDL cholesterol in several trials. Most policosanol supplements found in the U.S., including the reformulated Cholestin, contain policosanol extracted from beeswax and not the sugar cane policosanol. There is no evidence that policosanol extracted from beeswax can lower cholesterol. Additional studies on sugar cane policosanol are needed to determine its effectiveness in lowering cholesterol.

 

Other herbal products: The results of several studies suggest fenugreek seeds and leaves, artichoke leaf extract, yarrow, and holy basil all may help lower cholesterol. These and other commonly used herbs and spices -- including ginger, turmeric, and rosemary -- are being investigated for their potential beneficial effects relating to coronary disease prevention.

 

Dietary Approaches to Lowering Cholesterol

 

Increased consumption of dietary fiber, soy foods, and plant compounds similar to cholesterol (plant stanols and sterols) can significantly reduce LDL cholesterol, or bad cholesterol.

 

Fiber: Only plant foods (vegetables, fruits, legumes, unrefined grains) contain dietary fiber. The soluble fiber found in foods such as oat bran, barley, psyllium seeds, flax seed meal, apples, citrus fruits, lentils and beans are particularly effective in lowering cholesterol.

 

Soybeans: Substituting soybeans or soy protein for other proteins have been shown to prevent coronary heart disease by lowering LDL cholesterol and triglycerides. Soy protein is present in tofu, tempeh, soy milk, soy yogurt, edamame, soy nuts, and many other food products made from soybeans.

 

Phytosterols: Phytosterols (plant sterol and stanol esters) are compounds found in small amounts in foods such as whole grains as well as in many vegetables, fruits, and vegetable oils. They decrease LDL cholesterol, mostly by interfering with the intestinal absorption of cholesterol. Phytosterols can be found in spreads (like the cholesterol-lowering margarines Benecol, Promise, Smart Balance, and Take Control), dressings for salads, and dietary supplements. Additional phytosterol-fortified foods include Minute Maid Heart Wise orange juice, Nature Valley Healthy Heart chewy granola bars, CocoVia chocolates, Rice Dream Heartwise rice drink, and Lifetime low-fat cheese.

 

Dietary fiber, soybeans, and phytosterols decrease cholesterol levels by different mechanisms. Therefore, it is not surprising that the combined dietary intake of these foods and other plant substances, along with a low intake of saturated fats, is more effective at reducing cholesterol levels than each individual substance alone.

 

Including foods rich in omega-3 fatty acids in your diet may also help lower cholesterol. Aim for at least two servings of fatty fish like salmon, mackerel, herring, tuna, and sardines per week. Other dietary sources of omega-3 fatty acids include flax seed and walnuts.

 

Omega-3 fatty acids: These essential fatty acids have a favorable effect on cholesterol. Supplement sources include fish oil capsules, flaxseed and flax seed oil. Omega-3 fatty acids decrease the rate at which the liver produces LDL cholesterol and triglycerides. They have an anti-inflammatory effect in the body, decrease the growth of plaque in the arteries, and aid in thinning blood. If you are considering taking omega-3 fatty acids, you should first discuss with your doctor if omega-3 fatty acid supplements are right for you (especially if you are currently taking blood-thinning medication).

 

Avoid partially hydrogenated and hydrogenated vegetable oils. These man-made oils are sources of trans fatty acids known to increase LDL cholesterol. They lower heart-protecting HDL (good) cholesterol and increase the inflammatory response in the body. You can now find trans fats listed on the Nutrition Facts panel of packaged foods. Minimize consumption of trans fatty acid-containing food.

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Mike,

I am in the same boat. exercise and diet did nothing to change my cholesterol numbers. Without meds i am at 140 total but the nasty triglycerides where high. I have worked hard with my cardiologist to take the least amount of meds and work on the homeopathic end. What good is a healthy heart if you blow out other organs in the process?My triglycerides are now under control to the point that i am in the .5 times likely to have a heart attack bracket for my age.

Here's what i take.

krill oil------ the fish oil frozen or buffered doesn't work for my heartburn.

cinnamon------ many benefits including relief from muscle cramps. cheap capsule form at walmart.

slow niacin ----take it at bed time with an aspirin. helps with the flushing.

coQ10

 

Talk it out with you doctor about using anything homeopathic. Some things can make the situation worse or cancel out the meds. If you have side effects then bring those up as well. The last MD that told me that the side effects were in my head got the boot. My current cardiologist will tell you there are thousands of meds to use and one will work for you without the side effects. Dont live with side effects.

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Thanks Awake. This is hilarious. I just started using regular Niacin on Monday. Had my first hot flash today. The wife laughed her @ off. The hair on the back of my neck stood up and it got hot, but afterwards I had all kinds of energy. I read where some studies say the slower release ones don't work on the LDL the same way as the pure one. I'm going to see if this helps, and naturally, need to tweak the diet a bit

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A low cholesterol diet can really help to decrease cholesterol build up, that potentially brings about heart disease as well as other health problems. The human body does generate cholesterol, but a surplus in the blood stream is usually the outcome of a diet plan loaded with animal foodss such as red meat, ova and whole fat dairy. Shifting our diet plan to low cholesterol foods like grains, fresh fruits and nuts can not only reduce the cholesterol consumption but also actively fight current cholesterol.

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Hi Mike,

 

Tell me more about your cholesterol profile. I want to know what you LDL and HDL is, that is, the low density lipoprotein and high density lipoprotein values. Total cholesterol gives an incomplete picture about your situation.

 

Well, Dr. Bones, I just had my first blood test since the OP. The numbers aren't good. To review, I stopped taking statins close to a month ago. I decided the muscle aches and weakness being caused, just wasn't worth it anymore. I have been doing a lot of walking, in hope of shaking off the weakness and pain. That's not working very well, but I will continue. I had started taking niacin, endured the hot flashes, but after about a week or so, the legs started aching a lot again. More research led me to find that niacin can cause those aches too. So, no more niacin. I have been taking 3,0000 ml of fish oil a day and as of yesterday's test, that would have been all that was in my system. I have since bought some red yeast rice, which I am going to begin.

 

The numbers: 237 overall, 178 bad, 59 good.

 

I'll update as I go along. Maybe others can learn from my exp

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Looks like this thread is a little old but the niacin might be worth another try. How much were you taking with each dose? Something I've seen that can help reduce the side effects of the niacin is to start at a lower dose (say 500mg) and take it in conjunction with an NSAID (like motrin). Then you can gradually increase the dose of the niacin. Medscape (ie webMD) recommends no more than 2000mg per day on the niacin (to avoid overstressing your liver - especially important when you've been taking statins).

 

Big thumbs up on the omega3 fish oils! That stuff is fantastic for you in so many ways besides just the cholesterol. Has the fish taste erping decreased if you've been faithfully taking it?

Edited by murjd17

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Hi Murjd17: I backed off on the Niacin because only 100 mg started the leg aches again. I was surprised by that so I did more research and sure enough, I found some references to it. I've switched to red rice yeast and will be doing that for awhile before getting my next test. I have taken myself off all prescription Meds and am trying a more supplement-based approach. I'm frankly feeling better than I have in awhile, so I'm taking my time before I retest

Edited by MikeE

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From web MD:

Some of the herbal and nutritional supplements said to lower cholesterol include: ...

 

Omega-3 fatty acids: These essential fatty acids have a favorable effect on cholesterol. Supplement sources include fish oil capsules, flaxseed and flax seed oil. Omega-3 fatty acids decrease the rate at which the liver produces LDL cholesterol and triglycerides. They have an anti-inflammatory effect in the body, decrease the growth of plaque in the arteries, and aid in thinning blood. If you are considering taking omega-3 fatty acids, you should first discuss with your doctor if omega-3 fatty acid supplements are right for you (especially if you are currently taking blood-thinning medication).

 

Avoid partially hydrogenated and hydrogenated vegetable oils. These man-made oils are sources of trans fatty acids known to increase LDL cholesterol. They lower heart-protecting HDL (good) cholesterol and increase the inflammatory response in the body. You can now find trans fats listed on the Nutrition Facts panel of packaged foods. Minimize consumption of trans fatty acid-containing food.

 

I've been taking Omega-3 for a while now for digestive tract ulcers. I didn't even know it was good against cholesterol. Cool Beans!

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Forgot to answer the question about the fish oil belch. LOL. As someone that absolutely hates salmon, I was concerned, but it's not too bad. My wife loves salmon so if I belch I just direct it toward her. LOL. JK, she would get even by cooking it in the house. Seriously, I have read that putting them in the freezer will help the belch. I haven't tried it, so I cannot attest to it

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Other binding agents are available in OTC form in the drug Alli (Xenical). It binds fatty oils and helps you lose weight as well as lower cholesterol. It also trains you to eat right, because if you eat too many fatty foods, you actually poop oil! Major negative reinforcement...

 

Dr. Bones

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