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jerry9491

EMP question...

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OK, here's my question for all you rocket scientists out there...how does an EMP work? If your electronic device isn't hooked up to a power source, is the device still fried? What kind of equipment is safe from EMPs? These may be dumb questions, but I don't know everything...yet.

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I've been wondering about this, too, and whether it would be worthwhile to stockpile new/unplugged/un-batteried electronics, or construct a Farady cage, so that I could continue using devices post-event. But I don't know enough about EMPs to determine whether it's a scenario I should invest that much time in.

 

Frankly, I'm worried about car ignitions and whether any vehicles will work, let alone appliances, GPS, flashlights, etc.

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go to 'utah shelters .com " they have a good article on weapon effects on their home page lots of good good stuff on this site , i would encourage all to read, sorry about not linking it directly as i am somewhat technologicly retarded, (as well as not being able to spell technologicly)

Edited by rayz
spelling

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There are Several threads that cover this in detail including gov pubs and technical documents including the formula for a Faraday Cage in the Communications and Electronics section please go there also vehicles susceptibility and hardening is addressed in BOVS??? in the vehicles section

 

PS The site will not allow me to remove the double technicals some kind of glitch

Edited by warrior7r

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jerry,

 

The short easy answer is EMP intoduces an intense fluctuating magnetic field which can induce a massive current in just about any other electrically conductive object -- for example phone lines, power lines and even metal pipes. These unintentional antennas would pass the current spike on to any other electrical components down the line (say, a network of computers hooked up to phone lines). A big enough surge could burn out semiconductor devices, melt wiring, fry batteries and even explode transformers.

 

So, no, you do not have to be hooked up to electricity. EMP produces electricity in any length of conductive metal.

Edited by Rod

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