Sign in to follow this  
rckmsc628

Salt!

Recommended Posts

Salt..

Not many Swimsuit Models in this are ..lol

But have the history of this area,It produced salt for the Confederate Army to make gun power.I am going to find out this spring.They boiled the water off a certain mountain spring.

So finding local minerals will be on my Topo map soon also..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

OK here is my take could be wrong

 

It is better to buy it and cache it, you can still look for local sources and as I have posted it is a

 

good lawn edger cuts down on weed eating just remember it takes time to work and time to go

 

away.

 

I would rather have it as it is only 5 bucks for 40 pounds now if we were talking big bucks like 20 dollars

then I could understand the hesitation LOL

 

and you might as well get 2 and a bag of morton quick cure this will give you enough to salt meat

for a while.

 

it is also good for a mouth wash for sore throat thrush tooth and gum problems sinus infections

the list is long but worth investigation.

 

an bear grills enema with a pinch of salt and dissolved vitamins for a quick pick me up LOL

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My dog was a black lab perfect survivor companion! Would eat what ever i gave him to eat, blackberrys mulberrys what ever it was he would eat it. He would also share with me his catch rabbit, mouse, baby deer, or the occasional neighbors chicken! lol

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
My dog was a black lab perfect survivor companion! Would eat what ever i gave him to eat, blackberrys mulberrys what ever it was he would eat it. He would also share with me his catch rabbit, mouse, baby deer, or the occasional neighbors chicken! lol

 

That's a great idea, I can trade my wife in for a black lab. I understand they can be well trained, the Lab, that is. The wife, not so much.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

LOL rdkms628

 

I have and now have a black & golden labs they are great but dumb and a bit dense

or lets just say stubborn as skunk stink does not stop them from going after them.

 

they have good instinct and sense of some things and others are way beyond them

My BABY thinks hes a puppy and scoots under the couch and sticks out on all sides

but thinks he's hiding he's only 5 months old when he walked up in the driveway

I could hold him in the palms of both hands now he goes about 40++ pounds.

and he teethes on rocks tree limbs but we have learned him from the furniture LOL

 

As far as salt PURE is best for canning and preserving iodized causes some taste and clouding

problems and some are allergic to iodine FYI.

 

download this file of recipes to see how much tender quick to use

 

http://www.alliedkenco.com/pdf/mortons%20recipes.pdf

 

dry salting is a bit different here is a link to 5 part information

use a program like Open Office its free to convert to PDF by cut copy

and paste method

 

http://www.fao.org/docrep/003/x6932e/X6932E01.htm

Edited by juzcallmesnake

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In the desert, we have saltbush. Although it accumulates salt in its leaves, it isn't practical to extract salt from it. However, it only grows in saline soil, so if you find saltbush, the soil has a fair amount of salt in it. You can extract the salt from the soil much like you would to harvest potassium nitrate. Salt bush is edible, and I suppose you could get some salt from grazing on it.

 

Another key to finding salt is to understand the geology of your area. Salt deposits will be found anyplace ancient seas were located. One of Arizona's earlest sources of salt was mining along the Colorado River. The natives used the mines for centuries.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had thought about this as well...so I did a websearch.

 

Seems that we here in Texas we used to mine salt back in the late 1700s to 1800s, even fought a couple of battles over it. The salt is left over as a result of being an old seabed. I'd recommend that you guys do a search for your area or for the area around where your BOL is.

 

My personal guess is that when the bottom drops out its gonna be at least a 3 to 5 year shit storm...and then things will start to settle down somewhat. I doubt that any of us will have that many years of supplys, so knowing where you can find salt will be a good thing to know...and the salt itself would be a valuble trade commodity.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Only if you have a stubby neck......

 

I have been told I have no neck head and shoulders but no neck have worn a 48 or 50 jacket

since I was 16.

 

and that is as far as I could reach was the armpit my girl was 6' 2" add heels I am 5' 9"

as I have said before I am eclectic one was 4' 10" i am an equal opportunity voyeur umm may

have spelled that wrong and maybe not.....

 

as far as salt packing meat {dog gone it cannot get off the first part of this post} anyway

packing meat takes a lot of salt it can be reduced with final smoking and drying.

or brine soaking and then smoking.

 

200 pounds sounds about right and a few bags of Morton tender quick.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If I get the chance tomorrow I'll take a picture of the natural salt lick on my delivery route. The Confederate army in Alabama came from as far north as Montgomery to harvest it. It's in a little town called, Jackson Alabama. Actually, there are at least three places around the little town where salt was harvested.

 

 

Brain flash! Found the webpage about it.mhere ya go fellas!

http://www.clarkemuseum.com/html/salt_works.html

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Owoooooooo a FRENCH lick YUCK.

 

All I can add is there's plenty of bulk pure water softener salt available now for cheap why

procrastinate buy a bag a check until you have a barrel full leaving it in the original bag.

 

you will have spent 25 to 30 bucks in 12 weeks big deal and have enough to barter or use for

preparing your game or domestic meats for smoking curing or drying.

 

I keep telling people that 95% of what we get each day comes from 1,000 miles or further away

and prices are cheap because a lot comes from foreign / 3rd world countries that need our dollars

badly to survive. it is as always the middle man who gouges the prices and in bad times

black marketing will drive prices to record heights.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Also, check the names of the creeks and such for the area and why they were named. In KY, Blue Licks was named because of the natural salt licks in the area. Read the history of the pioneers that settled in the area, those old timers KNEW how to find salt and every other mineral needed, so they settled near certain places and usually there is a record for it. I do agree with JCMS and would stockpile now while supplies are cheap and available (cheap being relative to the day of week and oil prices...lol).

As for place names, they can also give you an idea of the terrain or enviroment, even in unfamiliar territory or a foreign nation. Death Valley was named so for a reason and find the name in English (I'm American so that is my language) because you don't want to camp out in a valley that translates into "Scorpion Valley" or (pick a nasty and add a terrain feature). Place names can be as important to learning the area as map recons. JMO

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well said, Reg5. I am a strong advocate for knowing the history of your area. The folks who settled it probably did not have generators, a/c or propane stoves. Finding out their solutions gives you a head start on making your own.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Little more than an hour away..

 

Saltville is a small town that lies mostly in Smyth County in southwestern Virginia, between the Holston River and the Tennessee and Virginia Railroad. During the American Civil War (1861–1865), Saltville was of strategic importance for two reasons: the railroad provided an important link between the eastern and western theaters of the war, and the town's salt mines were crucial in supplying provisions for the Confederate army. As such, Saltville was the target of numerous Union raids. It was also the site of a battle on October 2, 1864, when outnumbered Confederate cavalry troops repulsed the advance of Union troops

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Boil Hickory roots then boil the results away and whats left is salty...Blood is also a source of salt. Carrots beets and meat all have salt. Also since most of the middle part of the US was an inland sea there are a lot of natural salt licks. A lot of dirt has a salt content. Taste it and you will know. If it is salty you can refine it or just eat a little dirt like some kids do.You don't need as much as they used to say.

Edited by Danm

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this