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Guest kevin

hardtack, saving flour before mylar

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Guest kevin

flour is known for its short shelf life. so most preppers get around this by storing whole grain wheat to grind into flour as is needed. for others the room to store enough wheat to matter isnt an option. while many intend bug in for a bit, until a general panic can subside, then head to a long term plot of land out in the country. no matter your situation the unexpected is sure to happen. that is why, even tho we have renewable food sources, my family makes hardtack on snowy days. hard tack is the OLD school way of storing flour. it has been used for eons. simple as can be to make. just 3 cups of flour 1 cup of water and a tsp of salt. mix the salt in warm water slowly add the flour, stir, then kneed( takes a bit to work that much flour into so little water) roll it out THIN(anything thicker than a half inch is considered a deadly weapon is california and for once they are right!) about 1/8 th inch is good for both eating and storage without breaking. we cut ours with a round 1 1/2 inch cookie cutter at this point.(no sharp edges to poke the bag) then bake for 30 min at 375, after 30 min take out turn over and pop them back in for another 30. done.

what you have now is a flour brick of tooth breaking hardness that ,stored under dry cool conditions, can last decades. although taste in its brick form it can also be crushed and used like granola, re ground and used in cookies, cooked with black berries as a cobbler, ect. plus its fun for the kids to help on those days your trapped in the house.

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that's pretty handy, I'll have to give that a go. I recall my great grandfather used to make something similar with cornmeal when we're go out on our week long wilderness adventures as a child. Any idea what that might have been?

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good post

 

for some reason my flour lasts forever over a year in tupper wear but I freeze all my flour and when i need it

I take it out let it get to room temp and clean the container and put the flour in.

 

i keep a couple 5 pound bags in the freezer and one corn meal for fish frying.

 

we can always do what our forefathers did use it with paper to seal the cracks in the wall like wall paper

make glue with the flour of course this is before insulation.

 

I have never seen BAD flour my aunt kept it in a 5 gallon tin can made biscuits in the can pull out the dough

 

and sifted out any crumbs and dusted the board and we did not die or get sick and her biscuits were

heaven with butter and honey.

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My dad used to make what he called "pilot bread" which I believe is what we call hardtack. He was an avid hunter and his "pilot bread" was always part of his camp food. I remember having to soak it in coffee that had cream and a lot of sugar in it before attempting to eat it. I understand that it'll last for years.

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Guest kevin

hey tom i think your grandpa was making corn dodgers. cornmeal water and salt cooked in water with a little lard in a cast iron skillet. good, stable,filling........yup prepper grub for sure.

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hey tom i think your grandpa was making corn dodgers. cornmeal water and salt cooked in water with a little lard in a cast iron skillet. good, stable,filling........yup prepper grub for sure.

 

Thanks Kevin, I think I'll try making some, strange but I actually liked eating those things on the trail.

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My grandmother in VA, may she rest in peace, used to make hardtack and store it away. I guess she was a prepper too. Also made scratch cornbread everyday. As a kid I used to love crumbling up cornbread in a bowl of fresh milk on a hot summer day.

 

I thought corn doggers was just another term for hush puppies. I guess that depends on the state.

 

Sorry Kevin, no highjack intended

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My turn..

http://anurbanplot.blogspot.com/2009/01/what-are-corn-dodgers.html

Now Im getting hungry..

Rick said I could highjack this,LMAO

 

Great link Matt... forgot about Johnny Cakes, mentioned on that site. I had Johnny Cakes over in Williamsburg once upon a time. They were like small pancakes made with sweet cornmeal and laced with rum. They were awesome. Even better than Pop Tarts. LOL

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Guest kevin

anyone seen a sky cop? lol i dont know , some places may call corn dodgers, hushpuppies ,but here they arent quite the same...hushpuppies get cornmeal flour, eggs, and milk......dodgers just cornmeal water and salt....may be different area to area.

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yes boys and girls

 

any edible grain can be made into a cake {pancake} and with water or milk a pinch of salt egg or no egg

I have eaten any types of grains the world over made in this way as said it's quick and filling.

 

add honey butter mint leaves ginger citrus rind for a different flavor the old K rations had pilot crackers

in a can I ate some from 1943 in the 60's tasted good to me.

 

pilot crackers or hard tack can be made and canned like at an LDS cannery or

I would use vacuum bags made from mylar ought to last a long time and you can tell when

they loose there seal a euro sealer can make small bags out of one big one or your sealer should allow

you to seal and cut to size.

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Ok, question: How does flour go bad??????? I've never had a problem, so I'm a little lost here. Somebody 'splain, please.
yes i too am bewildered by this mysterious claim of flour going bad, well i guess if it gets wet...or bugs..i've had the same 2 lbs in a ziplock bag in my cupboard for at least 3 years and its still good

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yes i too am bewildered by this mysterious claim of flour going bad, well i guess if it gets wet...or bugs..i've had the same 2 lbs in a ziplock bag in my cupboard for at least 3 years and its still good

 

Well, I'm glad I'm not the only one. My larger bags are all in vacuum-sealed bags, the everyday container has a bay leaf in it. Never had a problem and the flour works just fine.

I also found one supply site that sells 50lbs of wheat flour.

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So I did a little experimenting in the kitchen today. I looked up a few recipes for Corn Dodgers online, most of them were a bit too refined, they had milk, eggs etc, in them. So I mixed and matched them a bit until I came out with some Corn Dodger I was satisfied with.

 

2 cups yellow corn meal

2 tbsp melted butter (made a batch with come bacon grease I'd just cooked up and that turned out just as good)

1 tsp salt

and two cups boiling water.

 

Some of my failures were a bit too runny to hand form into cakes, this recipe made a nice coarse paste that was easy to form and held together in the skillet. I fried a couple in butter, tasted pretty good by itself, did the rest in Canola, came out a touch oily but nothing that bother me. Been munching on them for the past couple hours, with some honey or strawberry jam they taste amazing. I'm thinking of maybe adding some dried fruit, or peppers to them. I am Curious to see how they hold up in a ziplock stored at room temperature.

 

Edit; I don't mean to hijack your thread, just reporting back on my little trial run.

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FREEZE YOUR FLOUR 10 DAYS TO KILL ALL I REPEAT ALL LITTLE CRITTERS

 

sorry i have post that like 5 times and all of you are right I have never seen bad flour except

buggy other than that NO.

 

WHY 10 DAYS JCMS

 

Glad you asked because I do not know the temp of your freezer and 10 days is a sure deal as long

as Ice stays solid 10 days will work.

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Guest kevin

when i spoke of flour going bad i wasnt meaning in a day or two.lol it lasts about 10 years in mylar before the nutritional values drop to "filler" level.i know 10 years seems a long time away but im prepping for the long haul, dont know when ill need this stuff and dont want to through 100 pounds of flour away every 10 years. but hardtack, according to what i have read, is more stable, lasting up to 50 years.as far as the bugs go...free protein.

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