DiscerningOne

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About DiscerningOne

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  1. DiscerningOne

    Evading the Invaders: Can you escape thermal sensors?

    Hi Regulator5 -- Thanks for advice. I know the night vision / thermal imagery technology has been used by LAPD for quite some time. Their police choppers are equipped with this technology and they use it to catch suspects in the streets at night. I can totally see drones being used this way in the future. It was the part about heat detecting us through walls that I wasn't sure about and that bothers me the most. I wanted to have a good basic hiding place in which to hunker down locked & loaded. I'll do some research and come back with what I find out. DiscerningOne
  2. Hello everyone, I'm still bothered by what I was told by a "prepping expert" at the recent Prepper's Convention in Dallas. Obviously we all want to avoid being sent to a FEMA camp. Suppose one night while you're at home with your family the power goes out and minutes later there are bright lights glaring outside and you hear the sound of trucks rolling in, helicopters flying overhead, men yelling orders through bullhorns, people screaming, dogs barking, etc. (you get the picture). After thinking about this I decided on building a hidden safe space in my home. This would be for me & family to escape any such situational "round up" and to use as a storm shelter. However, the "prepping expert" told me that no one can escape being captured by the black op invaders because they'll be using thermal tracking devices. These devices would find us in our safe rooms no matter the thickness or material content; and if we try to escape under cover of darkness. Is it true what he told me about the thermal sensors? And do you think this type of scenario would even happen? DiscerningOne You need both common sense and courage to survive.
  3. This is an old case (April 2008), but, it's chilling to hear the comments of expert reviewers and the actual judge in the case of things to come. In other words today! 4th Amend rights of Matt Hart violated by San Luis Obispo, CA County Sheriff's deputies: Part 1 of 2: http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=endscreen&NR=1&v=-wKRKGqYZjI Part 2 of 2: http://www.youtube.com/watch?NR=1&feature=endscreen&v=vt9y9RlMFzA I'm so glad I moved from California to Texas in 2006. Discerning One
  4. Did you ever see this video (below)? Check it out. I love this guy, he really knows his rights. Sadly, stuff like this is happening way more now. So here's my question to you: If I want to dig a hole in my yard to build an underground shelter will government officials invade my property without my consent and without a warrant just to see what I'm doing??? http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QTQAJgxMIuM Stay strong, Discerning One
  5. DiscerningOne

    Bowling Green, Kentucky

    Thanks guys, we’re staying in Texas. We do love it here and we know our community and the surrounding areas. Though more importantly to us is that Texas is a gun friendly state (so far anyway). Kentucky really does look beautiful, but, I got spooked when I read that movie director/producer John Carpenter is from Bowling Green; and that the movie Halloween was filmed in Smith Grove -- the next town over. Every year Smith Grove celebrates Halloween by shutting down all traffic lanes to/from town. But that’s nothing. It was when I was looking at places to live outside of Bowling Green that I got creeped out. I couldn’t figure out the housing market – why are there so many homes for sale and how could there be such drastic differences in the price and quality of homes within the same neighborhood. I mean there are homes selling for half a million dollars and down the same street another one selling for $40-$50K. Then I remembered what Hossfly said about Kentucky’s 2004 meth lab & crime problems. Some of those houses looked pretty dark (as in evil). And for some reason what I was seeing reminded me of that movie “The Road.” I started thinking of cannibals wanting to eat us and I could hear that little boy’s voice saying, “papa, papa.” Lol Funny my husband was thinking the exact same thing. He didn’t say anything to me until after we found out that the job in Kentucky had been filled. We had a really good laugh. Seriously though, I agree with Wally. Kentucky doesn’t seem like the best place to be when SHTF. There’s just too much disparity and it’s surrounded by too many other states that have their own laws.
  6. DiscerningOne

    Bowling Green, Kentucky

    @Hossfly: BTW I think that's so cool that you learned to fly.
  7. DiscerningOne

    Bowling Green, Kentucky

    Hey Hossfly, Wow! That's a ton of useful information. My husband actually called the Bowling Green COC and they're sending us a packet of information. Thanks for mentioning the crop soil. I was trying to find out about that. I had read that the soil there is nutrient rich, but, also clay (the percentage of clay depending on where you live). I so want to grow my own food. I started an outdoor survival garden here in McKinney,TX, but, had to abandon it because of mosquitoes. I was getting severely bit by them -- I mean seriously! Even when taking all the precautions those buggers still tagged me within minutes. One time I was bitten so bad that my ankle and foot swelled up (you could hardly see my toes) and I couldn't walk and had fevers for over a week. This was back in July. Now the city is spraying for WNV. Anyway, back to Kentucky: The history of Bowling Green is very interesting. I read that during the Civil War the citizens there sided with the North, but, then the Confederate soliders came to town and claimed it as their capitol city. As far as I know, my ancestors didn't fight in that war. Thanks for mentioning some of the other towns by name -- very helpful. I think back in 2004 every city was dealing with meth labs and related crimes. I'll try to get a hold of some crime reports. Hopefully things aren't so bad there now. Hey Wally, The area I'm looking at seems to have everything I'd need for self-reliance, plus there's woods, hills, some rugged terrain, water, caves, and I wouldn't be totally isolated. I always thought the densely populated suburbs near cities like Houston, Dallas, LA, Chicago, etc., would be the death traps. I'm sorry, I'm still learning about locations and what to look for. So, could you please tell me why you said anything East of Mississippi will be tough when SHTF??? Thanks guys, Discerning One
  8. DiscerningOne

    Bowling Green, Kentucky

    Hello, I've been out of work for over 6 months and today I had a really good interview via Skype for a job in Bowling Green, KY. I've never been to Bowling Green or Kentucky, but, it sure sounds like a nice place (the community, the geography/topography, etc.). My son who's in the Marines has a friend that's from Kentucky. He says its very beautiful there. What do you think of this location for a BIL? I'd like to hear from a real Kentuckian or anyone that's knowledgable about BIL's. Thank you, Discerning One
  9. DiscerningOne

    Social Issues that Matter

    I too agree with Capt Bart. I want to live in a free republic and have "Rule of Law" which is intended to protect us and help us to maintain civil order. Without ROL there most certainly would be chaos, mob rule, and anarchy. We the people (aka the citizens of this nation) still have the power to protect our rights through legal means. We have the power, but, more importantly the obligation to do so. Just as Awake stated, "Your freedoms are constantly under attack. The lack of education is allowing the government to seize those God given rights little by little." This is why it's so important that everyone know their rights and the law of the land. It's good that there are human rights and civil rights watchdog groups out there, but, its "we the people" that must take it upon ourselves to be educated and never presume "someone" will rescue us. Discerning One
  10. No problem Hossfly. Thanks for the info. I didn't know about this. Alicia
  11. Feedback from trusted sources, personal preference and experience will mean little if Big Data has its way. Check out this Forbes magazine article (link below). Barry Eggers is all for Big Data control. (Which doesn’t surprise me since Forbes is run by the “elite”). He writes that Big Data is the answer to our problems because it would replace all subjectivity (aka votes, opinion polls, sample surveys, top 10 lists, etc.). Eggers’ solution for a healthcare plan would be to use a computer rating system for doctors. Any doctor for whatever reason that ranks low on a list would be forced to stop practicing medicine. The key words here are “for whatever reason.” In other words, a good doctor would be in trouble for not reaching a patient quota because he/she is spending “too much” time administering quality care. Even your old car can end up last on some data list. I guess by then no one will remember the old saying that “One man’s junk is another man’s treasure”? So, what would happen if our society were to replace opinions, votes, and personal preference with data-generated lists? One thing’s for sure, we wouldn’t see much love, forgiveness, or creativity in the world. Discerning One Article: Eggers, B. (2012, Sept). The Problem With Lists - And The Fix From Big Data. Forbes http://www.forbes.com/sites/ciocentral/2012/09/25/the-problem-with-lists-and-the-fix-from-big-data/
  12. I hope you don’t mind my sharing some more on Big Data. There’s just too much going on right now that could impact our lives and our freedom. Sometimes I wonder if all the hype about the latest software technology is just some sick way for the powers that be to cause chaos and distraction. I know so many people that always seem to be scrambling to keep up. But, that’s another subject. What I really want to share with you now has to do with some alarming ways in which big data is currently being used. Personality assessments are nothing new, but, with the emergence of Big Data and the latest tools for predictive analytics, more companies and people are relying on computer algorithms to make their decisions for them. Below is a link to an article I read on Big Data and workplace management. This article really ticked me off. It talks about the use of behavioral assessment tests by companies when hiring hourly (minimum / low wage) workers. I don’t punch a clock or work in a blue collar field, but, never the less, I don’t like what’s happening here. I’ve personally noticed in the last year that more managers in my profession (IT / Corporate Services) are relying on group consensus for their hiring decisions. I miss the old days where you met with the boss and if he/she liked you (your character, personality, skills, etc.) you were in. The staff respected the boss’s decision (assuming this individual had integrity) and everyone made an effort to welcome the newcomer and work together in a professional way despite any prejudice or personal differences. So why are more managers now basing their hiring decisions on group consensus and psychological / personality tests? Do they lack decision-making skills and confidence? Are they afraid they’ll make the wrong decision, and if so, why? When thinking about these questions, set aside budget & cost constraints as an excuse for being overly cautious (especially when it comes to contract work where there are no company benefits or training costs involved). I personally think most (if not all) of this is a reflection of our current culture and the lack of true leadership within our general population. Like I said, this trend scares me because I’m seeing more people in positions of authority that don’t know how to lead, critically think, or decide on their own. Now we have simple hard-working folk being subjected to the latest psychological profile tests. These employment tests are basically designed to weed out the so-called “undesirables” for that particular company or job. It may be people that think too much (like me), ask too many questions (like me), care too much about others (like me), have personal debt (like me), travel so many miles to/from job site, and so on. It all depends on the type of job as to which human qualities or facts of life are considered troublesome by an employer. Don’t get me wrong, I know employers must be weary of bad people (the liars, thieves, terrorists, and psychopaths), but, I’m not talking about this. What I’m talking about is machines vs. the human brain and heart for basic decision-making. If this trend continues to grow or if test designers, deliberately or inadvertently, cross the line into certain “isms” (e.g. racism, sexism, ageism), I’ve no doubt we’ll be hearing about some very interesting discrimination lawsuits. That is, unless we no longer have any anti-discrimination, EEO, or civil rights left when this time comes. Discerning One Article: Walker, J. (2012, Sept). Meet The New Boss: Big Data. The Wall Street Journal http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10000872396390443890304578006252019616768.html
  13. I'm sure you've heard the saying "Information is Power." So what? Why should we care? Well, lately I've been seeing a lot more information about Big Data and the latest technological trends in business intelligence (e.g., data collection, analysis & decision-making). Every aspect of our lives can, and is, being collected as some form of data by some organization. Most everyone knows that businesses have always collected information about their buying preferences and shopping habits. This type of behavioral and relational information is a goldmine to marketers and product developers -- hence the term "data mining." Today, everything we do, including what we do in the privacy of our own home, and even within our own body, can be collected and analyzed without us being aware. So, how is this personal data being collected? The easiest form of collection is through devices and applications most of us use or are surrounded by all day and everyday. Devices such as smart meters, smart phones, WiFi, Bluetooth and GPS; TV/DVR boxes, Internet browsers, social media sites, indoor / outdoor surveillance & security cameras, employee access cards, product scanners, reward cards, and toll tags, etc. Not to mention the seemingly endless documentation (e.g., registrations, applications, and government forms) we submit throughout our lives, voluntarily or otherwise, starting from birth and continuing until even after our death. Everything about our lives produces a vast amount of interesting, and for research analysts invaluable, data -- "Big Data." If managed effectively, this Big Data can mean big bucks for big business and (dare I say) may ultimately be controlled by Big Bro. Of course, I'm all for having the best tools & techniques for forecasting and decision-making, but, this trend in Big Data and advanced analytics is leading us to uncharted territory with many potential pitfalls. This has always been a concern, ever since the Internet came of age, for many technology legal experts. To this day we still don't have full and adequate protection under the law on how our lives as "data" is being managed and controlled. We certainly don't own whatever about us is out there. Below is a link to an article (some of you may have already read it) which addresses the latest developments in nanotechnology and the use of RF-ID chips, both wearable and implantable; as well as a "chip pill." All of these devices are designed to measure and track our health and other aspects of our lives. So what does all this have to do with survival, liberty or freedom? These knew devices contain software. Software that for now is programmed to only collect and "read" data. Keep in mind this "programmable" software can at any time easily be re-programmed to a "read / write" mode and for any purpose (even nefarious). The power of technology is truly a double-edged sword. You'd have to be living under a rock not to be able to recall some historical or recent event where information and technology has been used for evil. Its important, especially nowadays, that people not get too excited about every new technological advancement; and to always look at the source. Follow the money trail backwards to find out who created the plan, who paid for its development, who controls its sale and use, and what is their intended purpose. Is this latest technology... Exciting?: Yes Safe?: That depends on your definition of "safe" Used solely for good?: Only time will tell If you're a Christian like me, you obviously see all this as a dire warning of things to come (aka the infamous "mark of the beast"). In my mind, the turning point would be after doctors (wittingly or unwittingly) have convinced their patients to wear the patch, or ingest the chip-pill; and the majority of the population is sporting the latest chip-lined fashions. Irregardless of your religious or non-religious beliefs, the fact remains that Big Data Technology is the new "wild west" and our liberty and freedoms are at risk of literally being "chipped" away. Take care and remain vigilant, Discerning One Article: "Big Data in Your Blood": http://bits.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/09/07/big-data
  14. I'm sure you've heard the saying "Information is Power." So what? Why should we care? Well, lately I've been seeing a lot more information about Big Data and the latest technological trends in business intelligence (e.g., data collection, analysis & decision-making). Every aspect of our lives can, and is, being collected as some form of data by some organization. Most everyone knows that businesses have always collected information about their buying preferences and shopping habits. This type of behavioral and relational information is a goldmine to marketers and product developers -- hence the term "data mining." Today, everything we do, including what we do in the privacy of our own home, and even within our own body, can be collected and analyzed without us being aware. So, how is this personal data being collected? The easiest form of collection is through devices and applications most of us use or are surrounded by all day and everyday. Devices such as smart meters, smart phones, WiFi, Bluetooth and GPS; TV/DVR boxes, Internet browsers, social media sites, indoor / outdoor surveillance & security cameras, employee access cards, product scanners, reward cards, and toll tags, etc. Not to mention the seemingly endless documentation (e.g., registrations, applications, and government forms) we submit throughout our lives, voluntarily or otherwise, starting from birth and continuing until even after our death. Everything about our lives produces a vast amount of interesting, and for research analysts invaluable, data -- "Big Data." If managed effectively, this Big Data can mean big bucks for big business and (dare I say) may ultimately be controlled by Big Bro. Of course, I'm all for having the best tools & techniques for forecasting and decision-making, but, this trend in big data and advanced analytics is leading us to uncharted territory with many potential pitfalls. This has always been a concern, ever the since the Internet came of age, for many technology legal experts. To this day we still don't have full and adequate protection under the law on how our lives as "data" is being managed and controlled. We certainly don't own whatever about us is out there. Below is a link to an article (some of you may have already read it) which addresses the latest developments in nanotechnology and the use of RF-ID chips, both wearable and implantable; as well as a "chip pill." All of these devices are designed to measure and track our health and other aspects of our lives. So what does all this have to do with survival, liberty or freedom? These knew devices contain software. Software that for now is programmed to only collect and "read" data. Keep in mind that this is "programmable" software that at any time can easily be re-programmed to a "read / write" mode and for any purpose (even nefarious). The power of technology is truly a double-edged sword. You'd have to be living under a rock not to be able to recall some historical or recent event where information and technology has been used for evil. Its important nowadays that people not get too excited about every new technological invention; and to always look at the source as well as the intended purpose. Is this latest technology... Exciting?: Yes Safe?: That depends on your definition of "safe" Used solely for good?: Only time will tell If you're a Christian like me, you obviously see all this as a dire warning of things to come (aka the infamous "mark of the beast"). In my mind, the turning point would be after doctors (wittingly or unwittingly) have convinced their patients to wear the patch, or ingest the chip-pill; and the majority of the population is sporting the latest chip-lined fashions. Irregardless of your religious or non-religious beliefs, the fact remains that Big Data Technology is the new wild west and our liberty and freedoms are at risk of literally being "chipped" away. Take care and remain vigilant, Discerning One Article: "Big Data in Your Blood": http://bits.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/09/07/big-data
  15. DiscerningOne

    Hello from North Texas

    Wow! I really appreciate everyone's warm welcome. I forwarded your thanks to my son. It means a great deal. @OregonChick: Thanks for the great weblinks. I'll definitely check them out. Funny, my son told me about "pantryparatus" several months ago. In fact, he showed me SurvivalCache too. You see, we think alike and are trying to connect with like-minded people. Folks just like you -- aware of what's going on and of what's at stake.