camdogs88

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  1. camdogs88

    Gun safe thoughts

    But I drive a truck, I do not have a trunk! Blasphemy! Haha
  2. camdogs88

    Gun safe thoughts

    My safe was bought from costco, is about 500 lbs and has fireproof protection to some degree I cannot remember. Only disappointment I had in it was that it ended up being made in China. I really do not like China or their products so to not have that listed bummed me out quite a bit. I would honestly like to have the electronic lock changed to a dial lock instead. The button portion of the safe has a cord attached and it lifts off the safe for battery change but the combo is stored inside the safe. Pretty solid deal for the price. I like the hook above the door concept, not bad, also considered hooks underneath a bed. I am not sure about leaving a rifle that could be my lifeline, in a safe that could be stuck, or outside where it could be stolen. Guess I just need to buy way more guns so they can't possibly all disappear. Haha. But silverwolf55, just another reason to not get married right?
  3. camdogs88

    Gun safe thoughts

    So I recently read the book, one second after, and they mention tons of things I never thought of regarding if electronics were destroyed. But one thing I never recall being mentioned was that a lot of people probably have their weapons in gun safes that have electronic locks(I do). So if an EMP did happen, all my weaponry is locked up pretty darn well. Only exception for me is that I keep my Kimber close at just about all times. Any ideas of how to safely stage a carbine or primary weapon and a good selection of ammo without breaking the safety law of leaving no weapon around for unauthorized use? I live with my parents and there are no small children or unauthorized users here.
  4. camdogs88

    What's Your Take on Reloading?

    Wouldn't the corncob media scrub that off? I mean steps could be taken to sort them before but just curious.
  5. camdogs88

    What's Your Take on Reloading?

    The only time I use new brass is in my bolt gun when I am trying to get as good of shots as I can. Otherwise I use brass I fired, or brass that is left laying in the desert. It requires some sorting but its free so I can't complain. However rifle brass will "flow" during firings and need to be trimmed. So the brass basically gets longer near the mouth and thinner on the walls due to pressure. That being said it is only recommended that you reload rifle brass a handful of times. I personally don't shoot rifles enough to really keep track of brass life even though I probably should. It becomes tough to count loadings when you pick it up off the ground and are unsure if it was yours. I say just keep the brass from any range session and build your sorted collection. In my .308 I run new brass, varget powder, winchester primers, berger bullets. Bergers have really high BC and have great quality control, however they run expensive so that is not a plinking round. I would say start with pistol cartridges myself. Doesn't hurt to learn on something easy first. I think I load my 9mm for like 60% of factory price.
  6. camdogs88

    Getting Started

    9mm is cake. can load em up cheap. 5.56 is a pain in the butt and requires lube, then wipe it off, trimming of the cases, then deburing. I do not enjoy that so much myself. As far as 5.56vs .223, they don't make 5.56 dies that I have ever seen. I run my .223 dies on military brass too, just an extra step for it in the prep area. My barrel is for 5.56 so it can run either round. I haven't ever seen lead rounds for rifles in very fast calibers myself.
  7. camdogs88

    Getting Started

    I am pretty sure that ramen comes in plastic bags or Styrofoam cups But I hear you, I would say if you eat that cheap then you trump me most days. I work at Target, so I do not stack much extra money myself. One afterthought, If you planned to reload for survival, it is a good skill without a doubt, however for a situation of my life on the line I will carry nothing but hollows and factory rounds til none remain. A hot ball of lead seems like it would damage far less than a factory jacketed round. Lead is my practice stuff. But congrats on the job and keeping your head above water. Self sufficiency(especially in finances)is a rarity in this world. -Cams
  8. camdogs88

    Getting Started

    I always just pick up all the brass, whether it was mine or not. I live in PHX so it doesn't rain all too often so its a safe bet that you can use most of what is found. Once you become familiar with head stamps you can choose to scrap what you don't like, or are unsure of. I recently had 50lbs of spent brass scrapped and was able to get like 55 bucks. Not bad since I was already knelt down to pick up other brass. I would honestly say that if you cannot afford to buy all the equipment to just forget the idea. The tools add up in cost very fast and if you are trying to make a good amount of anything, single stage will take forever. I only use single stage for making like 20 .308 rounds at a time. Then I am tired of it. Progressive I can crank a few hundred before I am bored of it. When I started out I spent around a 1000 on equipment, and would say I have spent around another 500 on other things not including components the next year. But I knew I was tired of only being able to find hollow points for a dollar a piece, makes practice a rare concept at that price. FMJ's were no where to be found around election time and I decided to take the plunge. I like reloading and truly enjoy the increased volume but it is not for everyone. I assume Kraft dinner and Ramen cups wouldn't cut the food budget down enough to save money every month? Haha. I laugh but honestly when I choose a gun purchase or something I just take it out of my food costs by eating cheap cheap food for a few months.
  9. camdogs88

    Training Dvd's, your thoughts?

    Hey Crew! I was looking through the forum and didn't see a training or tactics section. I have been a fan or Travis Hayley and Chris Costa for quite some time(some can talk trash about them and that is okay with me). I own the Art of the dynamic handgun and the art of the tactical carbine 1&2. The pistol and the second carbine one taught me a lot about shooting and helped improve my grip tremendously and teach me things I had never considered. Since Travis has gone off on his own now, I have been following him on Youtube and keeping up with his projects. Now for the question. Has anyone purchased Travis's adaptive dvds from panteo, and if so what were your thoughts? Even better if you can compare and contrast to the magpul series. Thanks! If you are interested in how to become a better shooter I enjoyed the pistol video quite a bit and would highly recommend it. Since this is my first thread, I hope I didn't do anything silly or break any rules I wasn't aware of. Have a good weekend, whats left of it! -Cams
  10. camdogs88

    Getting Started

    I would recommend a progressive loader, but I too own a single stage, it just rarely gets used when the progressive is right next to it. If I run the single stage I need to have the press, dies, shellholder, case lube, powder trickler(it is easier to drop little grains at a time with it vs other fancy equipment), scale, loading block, powder funnel, case trimmer, chamfer, swager(if using military brass to remove crimp- this is a pain in the hands if you do it by hand) and then components for the round. That is all that I can think of at the moment besides tumbler and media. It is definitely not a cheap start up regardless of what process you do. Not to mention you will shoot those rounds out so fast that it will make you sad knowing you loaded them one at a time and put all that love into them. Haha. -Cams
  11. camdogs88

    What's Your Take on Reloading?

    I cannot say that I am an expert because you truly keep learning more about weaponry as you go. What calibers do you specifically mean for once fired or new brass?
  12. camdogs88

    What's Your Take on Reloading?

    That indeed is a tough spot. You can shop online for bulk once fired brass, or new brass if you have the money. I personally have only purchased brass new for my bolt action .308 otherwise I am not interested in the best shot possible so whatever I pick up will do. I have seen brass on craigslist and sometimes backpage, but I don't know what to expect from random people like that. I guess in reality if you love to shoot those two calibers, then your brass will add up quite well after a few months of shooting factory ammo. I have standardized calibers on every weapon I currently own, and I cannot say I have seen more than a handful of makarov in my few years of shooting and reloading.
  13. camdogs88

    What's Your Take on Reloading?

    Honestly If you have the primers, powder and projectiles to support a long series of reloading you will be fine with your brass. 9mm and .45acp are really strong, don't have too much pressure and keep working til the brass finally splits. Plus if you shoot at a range you can probably acquire more brass every time you shoot from now til SHTF. My brass collection keeps growing and I rarely have one I have to toss. I would say I probably have 5k pieces of 45 brass and I hope to someday next year load up every single piece of brass I have in that caliber... not an easy accomplishment. -Cams
  14. camdogs88

    What's Your Take on Reloading?

    First post! #3. I personally love reloading. If you enjoy your firearms you can't go wrong with reloading. It allows me to shoot a far greater volume than anyone else I know. I am 23 and work in retail so I do not have tons of money, so it helps. Initial investment was about 800 for press and needed tools. Then spend a few hundred on supplies for that caliber and you're rolling. I have a dillon rl550b and started out with .45acp, I ended up shooting 8000 rounds my first year of loading. Now I load, 45, 357sig, 308, 9mm and 5.56(which I do not like loading). So refreshing to go out to the range with a gladbag of ammo and just shoot as much as you want. I highly recommend you RELOAD! In my first Lyman reloading handbook (which I will assume was printed at the latest date listed in 1995), it stated that over 4million people reload ammunition and produce more than all the major ammo manufacturers combined. I would say that is very substancial! -Cams