Joe Knight

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About Joe Knight

  • Rank
    Junior Member

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  • Biography
    Retired Physician Assistant and now a writer. Went to the Army PA school, was a battalion surgeon in an armor unit in Germany then a battaion surgeon in the arctic infantry in Alaka. Switch to the Air Force then retired in 1993.
  • Interests
    Survival medicine, BS in biology and did some master's work in geology, (damn, ran out of space)
  • Occupation
    Writer
  1. Good information by Dr. Bones. The only thing I could add is in the event you have to transport someone over a significant distance, you may consider building a travois. A good vid that shows how to build a travois can be found at .
  2. Hello Murjd17: I fully agree with Dr. Bones. The Emergency Department is the BEST place to learn, well, emergency medicine, which will be almost anything beyond a cut or blister in a post-SHTF world. If I may add, most hospitals carry-out mass-casualty (mass-cal) drills and you should volunteer to be involved in as many of them as possible. In your typical day in the ER, it's unlikely you'd be involved in an ugly thing called triage, but in a mass-casualty situation, triage will be mandatory - you want to save as many lives as possible, even if it involves letting others pass-away. In a post-SHTF world, the severe lack of medical equipment and supplies is going to MANDATE triage, so you may as well get used to the concept in a world where, like Dr. Bones say, you still have electricity.
  3. Hi Zen: May I also suggest you and your family take as many first aid classes, CPR classes, etc as you can? Contact your local Red Cross. If you've got a son or daughter in the Boy or Girl Scouts, they are now on the non-volunteer list for the First Aid merit badge (I've had several scout troops over the years, including a Brownie Troop and First Aid was ALWAYS top priority). Another thing is to get yourself an Army surplus suture kit, go to a medical supply store and get some suture material, watch a couple of videos on suturing on YouTube, then practice on an orange (it's very unlikely you'll find a volunteer).
  4. You’re welcome, of course. I have several concerns that I want you to consider before jumping onto the Guard: 1. If you have Crohn’s, that might eliminate you from joining. The military doesn’t want to have people come in that have chronic, debilitating medical issues that may affect training or deployment. If you’re in already and develop a medical problem, that’s a different issue – once you’re “in”, your butt belongs to Sam and he’s responsible for taking care of you. So I would check with the recruiter before you go filling out endless forms and testing only to find you’re not qualified 2. If you’re in the Guard and TSHTF, you’re not “leaving” anywhere. The first thing the President if going to do is declare martial law, and it’s the Guard that is the first ones called out. And if martial law is declared, and a Guardsman decides to not report in or, worse yet, to desert, you literally can be shot for desertion. I’m not a violent person by any stretch of the imagination, but if you take an oath “to protect and defend”, then you decide that you would just rather go home instead of doing your share in keeping law and order, you deserve to be shot. OK, if not shot, then a rather long-term visit to Fort Leavenworth (the military prison) would be in order. Along with a dishonorable discharge. 3. A lot of troops who have returned from the Middle East suffer from Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD); however, the military had finally pulled their collective heads out of their collective asses and now recognize it as a real disease entity and offer counseling and treatment to troops returning to the Unites States. You may want to drag your uncle kicking and screaming down to a veteran’s center. If he won’t go, contact the vet’s center and they’ll send a couple of veterans that have been in battle out to talk to him. If he needs help, he needs to get it now. Many of our Vietnam vets suffer from the same problem, but PTSD wasn’t recognized back then, and here we are, 40 years later and many of these guys still haven’t recovered from their trauma 4. I’m not big into alternative medicine, only because I’ve practiced conventional medicine for 40 years. I’m not denigrating alternative medicine, but if you see advertisements on TV for something to treat a medical condition, it needs some serious researching. The FDA was established in the ‘30s specifically in an effort to weed-out snake oil salesmen; however, today, there are so many loopholes in the law that it’s almost worthless. So before you seek alternatives to conventional medicine, do your homework. What to do in a post-SHTF world is going to be difficult – I don’t want to sound callous, but a lot of folks with chronic diseases simply aren’t going to make it because the technology (machines, medication manufacturing, etc) is simply going to disappear. Hope that answers your questions, New Hampshire. Now, let’s bring on some medical questions….
  5. Well, you’ve got several lines of thought going here, so let’s hit them one-at-a-time: 1. You want to join the NG. This is excellent – not only for your country but for yourself. The Guard is patterned after the Army, so I’ll tell you what to expect: First, you’ll go to Basic Training, where they turn civilians into soldiers. After BT, you’ll go to school (called Advanced Individual Training, or AIT) to learn a specific job, called an MOS (for Military Occupational Specialist). After that, since you’ll be Guard, I’m not exactly sure what the training requirements are, but I think it’s one weekend-per-month and two-weeks-per-year (if I’m wrong, anyone can feel free to correct me). Now, in your case, you’ll want to request school for a Field Medic 2. You may hate gross things, but if your unit is activated and sent somewhere to fight, you’re going to see a lot of “gross” things, so you’re just gonna have to suck it up and deal with it. And in a post-SHTF world, you’ll see things you couldn’t possibly imagine, so learn your training well – not just for the buddy’s in your unit, but for your family/tribe after everything falls apart 3. Now, as far as being a doctor specializing in nutrition, vitamins, etc, you may want to look a becoming a naturopath, a homeopath or a nutritionist; however, none of those jobs are going to be useful in a post-SHTF world. If you want to become seriously useful to your tribe after everything falls apart out there, you’ll bust your butt while in the Guard, learning everything you can about medicine (along with non-medical training). I would suggest going out for the Expert Field Medicine Badge (EFMB) and the Combat Care Casualty Course (called “C4” in military jargon). You can google either of these and learn more I hope this gives you a good overview. Feel free to ask any follow-up questions and good luck to you!
  6. Hello Everyone: My name is Joe Knight and I'm a retired Physician Assistant (PA). I went to the Army PA school and was a battalion surgeon in Germany, then a battalion surgeon in the arctic infantry in Alaska. I retired from the military in 1993, worked as a PA in the civilian world, and retired from civilian practice in 2005 so I could pursue my dream of becoming a writer. I’ve been very successful so far as a medical writer, and enjoy continuing to write. My interests are all over the place – my main interest is survival medicine, but I also enjoy medieval history and working-out with medieval weapons (much to the chagrin of my kids) and hitting the gym three-four times-a-week (the “growing old gracefully” thing is a bunch of BS). I’ve got a B.S. in biology and did some master’s work in geology, so any kind of science interests me. I enjoy history and science writing, but my main interest is medical writing. I would be happy to answer any questions related to survival medicine, as long as you keep in mind that we’re talking SURVIVAL medicine. I won’t tell you how to transplant a kidney or how to do major surgery, but when one is in a survival situation, all kinds of medical issues are going to crop up. Think malnutrition, lice, infections, cold weather and heat injuries – I think you get my drift. Feel free to ask any questions you want – if I don’t feel I can answer them or if I feel what you’re asking is beyond a non-medical person’s capabilities, I’ll be honest and let you know. But there is so much you’re going to NEED to know so you and your tribe can stay healthy, so feel free to ask. I’ve had a lot of medical articles published, so if your question can be answered by reading one of my articles, I’ll give you the link. So, let the fun begin…..
  7. Hello Everyone: My name is Joe Knight and I'm a retired Physician Assistant (PA). I went to the Army PA school and was a battalion surgeon in Germany, then a battalion surgeon in the arctic infantry in Alaska. I retired from the military in 1993, worked as a PA in the civilian world, and retired from civilian practice in 2005 so I could pursue my dream of becoming a writer. I’ve been very successful so far as a medical writer, and enjoy continuing to write. My interests are all over the place – my main interest is survival medicine, but I also enjoy medieval history and working-out with medieval weapons (much to the chagrin of my kids) and hitting the gym three-four times-a-week (the “growing old gracefully” thing is a bunch of BS). I’ve got a B.S. in biology and did some master’s work in geology, so any kind of science interests me. I enjoy history and science writing, but my main interest is medical writing. I would be happy to answer any questions related to survival medicine, as long as you keep in mind that we’re talking SURVIVAL medicine. I won’t tell you how to transplant a kidney or how to do major surgery, but when one is in a survival situation, all kinds of medical issues are going to crop up. Think malnutrition, lice, infections, cold weather and heat injuries – I think you get my drift. Feel free to ask any questions you want – if I don’t feel I can answer them or if I feel what you’re asking is beyond a non-medical person’s capabilities, I’ll be honest and let you know. But there is so much you’re going to NEED to know so you and your tribe can stay healthy, so feel free to ask. I’ve had a lot of medical articles published, so if your question can be answered by reading one of my articles, I’ll give you the link. So, let the fun begin…..